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Courage the Cowardly Dog

The Gods Must Be Goosey

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The Gods Must Be Goosey is the {{{numInSeasonWord}}} episode in [[Season {{{seasonWord}}}]] of Courage the Cowardly Dog. It aired {{{airDate}}}.

Plot Outline

A lonely goose god falls in love with Muriel and tries to woo her in order to make her his queen, so Courage must help her see that her true place is with Eustace.

Plot

While Eustace is outside working on his truck, a lonely goose god up in the clouds is woeful in that he can't seem to find love. But when he sets his eyes upon Muriel, he decides to woo her and he floats down from the clouds, much to Courage's dismay. The Goose God offers an endless field of flowers that covers all of Nowhere, but Muriel is adamant that her place is with Eustace and kindly declines. Courage is satisfied, but the goose god is relentless.

The Goose God continues to try to woo Muriel, who seems to be pleased, much to Courage's horror. Eustace doesn't listen when Courage tries to tell him, so Courage begins to try to remind Muriel that her heart is with Eustace. He is successful, and Muriel once again declines the Goose God's offer to be his queen. Furious, the goose god tries to kidnap Muriel. Courage tries to get Eustace, but Eustace is too busy with his truck. To get his attention, Courage honks the horn and Eustace screams and passes out due to the loud horn. The goose god then takes a liking to the truck because of the honk, and floats off into the sky with Eustace's truck.

A few days later, Muriel receives an invitation to the wedding between the goose and Eustace's truck; meanwhile, Eustace sobs outside about his truck.

Characters

Antagonists/Villains

Trivia

  • First appearance of the Goose God.
  • The Goose God's theme music is Mozart's Symphony No. 40.
  • This is the first time Courage calls Eustace by his name.

Cultural references

  • The episode's title is a reference to the South African comedy "The Gods Must Be Crazy."
  • This might be a reference to the palindrome "Do geese see God?"

Confusions

  • The episode may be influenced by the Greek myth of Zeus and Nemesis, wherein Nemesis turned into a goose to avoid Zeus's affections, but Zeus becomes a swan in order to pursue her.

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